Monday, March 16, 2009

My World Tuesday



Doors on two of many mausolea in the old Calvary Cemetery, Queens, N.Y.



Repetitive leaf design. The slight color yellow you can see on the upper right is from the stain glass window at the back of the structure.

A mausoleum (plural: mausolea) is an external free-standing building constructed as a monument enclosing the interment space or burial chamber of a deceased person or persons. A mausoleum may be considered a type of tomb or the tomb may be considered to be within the mausoleum. A Christian mausoleum sometimes includes a chapel.

The word derives from the Mausoleum of Maussollos (near modern-day Bodrum in Turkey), the grave of King Mausollos, the Persian satrap of Caria, whose large tomb was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Historically, mausolea were, and still may be, large and impressive constructions for a deceased leader or other person of importance. However, smaller mausolea soon became popular with the gentry and nobility in many countries. In the Roman Empire, these were often ranged in necropoleis or along roadsides: the via Appia Antica retains the ruins of many private mausolea for miles outside Rome. However, the practice fell out of use when Christianity became dominant.[1]

Later, mausolea became particularly popular in Europe and her colonies during the early modern and modern periods. These are usually small buildings with walls, a roof and sometimes a door for additional interments or visitor access. A single mausoleum may be permanently sealed. A mausoleum encloses a burial chamber either wholly above ground or within a burial vault below the superstructure. This contains the body or bodies, probably within sarcophagi or interment niches. Modern mausolea may also act as columbaria (a type of mausoleum for cremated remains) with additional cinerary urn niches. Mausolea may be located in a cemetery, a churchyard or on private land.

Thanks to the My World Team:

Klaus | Sandy | Ivar | Wren | Fishing Guy | Louise

maryt/theteach


14 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Really interesting information, Mary, and terrific photos! Thanks so much for sharing them today. Have a great week!

ChrisC and JonJ said...

Beautiful photos.I would love to have the second set of doors for my own house!

Janie said...

Interesting info on mausoleums, and beautiful photos of the reliefs.

Babooshka said...

Fascinating info and those carving are beautiful. My kind of post.

SandyCarlson said...

I love the artistry. The elegant form of the classic female figure make me think forever and blink of an eye at the same time.

ewok1993 said...

Really nice detailing teach. Love the door carvings.

J said...

I didn't know that about mausoleums so thanks.Looks like an interesting graveyard.

Arija said...

I wonder, does the expense of a mausoleum give the inmates Brownie points when they get to the pearly gates? The gates are impressive and your photos as well.

Annie said...

Wonderful photos Mary. Thank you! And the first one in the series of the ponds/lakes below...very beautiful (with ducks).

Today's Blah... said...

Wow, impressive doors. Looks like they're of brass...

Lily Hydrangea said...

so beautiful Mary! thanks for sharing. I'm sure I'd never see these otherwise.

storyteller's other blog said...

I love learning new things and you never fail to intrigue. Thanks ;--)
Hugs and blessings,

Carver said...

Those are beautiful doors and such an interesting post about the mausoleums.

PJ said...

Are they sub-leasing? They're beautiful. Keep up the great work, you know I love images like these.

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